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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Originally A Circa 1940 Baltimore Gas and Electric Office on Duke of Gloucester Street • Tuesday September 27th 2016

A Well Placed Tree

Formerly a Circa 1940 Commercial Georgian Style Baltimore Gas and Electric Co Office in Annapolis Maryland September 27th 2016

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Actually it was the tree that first caught my attention as I was taking in the late afternoon sunshine here in Annapolis today. It seemed almost perfectly placed there in front of this c1940 building. I can’t remember for sure if it was built as a Baltimore Gas and Electric office or whether it replaced one that had previously stood at this location prior to 1946, but I believe it was the former.

My own records of this Duke of Gloucester Street lot showed it as being empty in 1945 yet by 1946 this Commercial Georgian style two story building had been erected on it. Decades later this same building may have served as a bank, during that period bars could be seen on the exterior of its first floor side windows.

Anyway I thought that the location and relative proportions of this tree to the building was interesting along with how its branches fan across the upper facade.

Enjoy the rest of the day,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Circa 1890s Shingle Architecture and a Remaining Vestige of the Hell Point Neighborhood • Monday September 26th 2016

Appreciating the Calm Before the Boat Shows Begin

Circa 1890s Shingle Architecture and Vestiges of the Hell Point Neighborhood of Annapolis Maryland September 26th 2016

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More so than the Shingle architecture of this mid 1890s building it was the empty setting at the intersection of these two lower downtown streets that caught my attention earlier in the day. For you see currently over on Back Creek logistical preparations are underway for moving a multitude of floating docks, sections of tall chain link fences and other materials used in the upcoming Power Boat and Sailboat Shows to the Annapolis Harbor area.

So standing along Craig Street earlier I found myself basking in the peacefulness of the morning while at the same time thinking back to previous boats shows where the Prince George Street side of this building resembled more a controlled scene of chaos amid left over materials, temporary storage sheds and scores of tightly parked event vehicles.

Yes beginning later this week temporary no visitor parking signs will sprout up along Prince George Street sidewalks beginning here at the bottom of the old Hell Point neighborhood extending up to College Avenue, and even across sections of that street as well as downtown parking becomes even more of a challenge.

The visible presence of the City Dock, normally enjoyed throughout the year by both locals and visitors alike, along Compromise Street as well as the Ego Alley promenade will be obstructed by six foot high chain link fences, they themselves draped in numerous participating show vendor’s promotional banners. Traffic will be hectic and heavy as throngs of pedestrians make nearby sidewalks appear to be a cross between the bustling sidewalks of New York City and a retail town center at the height of Black Friday.

Alas for most of the upcoming three weeks downtown Annapolis will certainly be less welcoming, appealing and open if you would not only for locals but unaware visitors alike. There is no doubt that the annual boat shows bring needed revenue to a variety of local businesses as well as representing yet another aspect of our City’s recreational maritime character.

Anyway it was certainly nice to be able to enjoy the tranquility of this downtown setting earlier so I guess I’ll be back after mid October, that is when the quite morning ambiance of this Annapolis street corner has returned.

Have a pleasant day and a good week,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – 97 Prince George Street at Craig – Shingle Architecture Photography
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photographs • The Mid 18th Century Charles Carroll House and its Recently Recreated Front Porch • Sunday September 25th 2016

Enjoying a Bit of History on a Picturesque Day

Publisher’s Note: This photo journal entry includes the tenth period building or residence being featured in my 18th Century Architecture of Annapolis Collection. In the future as weather conditions, natural lighting and an absence of location clutter permits additional period buildings and residences will be included as well. The singular goal in assembling this annotated photography collection is to present each of the 90 plus 1700’s era buildings and residences located in the City of Annapolis today via my photographs, research and curated content.

The weather today in Annapolis has been, well, picturesque to say the least and I spent an hour or so visiting the Charles Carroll House once again so as to checkout its recently completed recreated period like front porch. I believe that the formal dedication of the finished project took place a couple of Sunday’s ago and now seeing it for the first time it certainly is a sight to be appreciated especially in the context of historical, and actually yes historic, 18th century City architecture.

As an aside if you happened to have missed my May 18th journal post featuring the original mid 1700s north wall as well as the front door area both before and during the project please follow this link.

In any event below are three photographs of mine that were taken earlier featuring a northwest perspective of the Charles Carroll House followed by a view of the new front porch and finally a closeup look of the porch, pediment and supporting brick work.

A Northwest Perspective of the Mid 1700s Charles Carroll House on a Picturesque Day in Annapolis Maryland September 25th 2016

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The photograph above might just turn out to be one of the better one’s that I’ve ever taken of the Charles Carroll House over the years. It includes the west facing porch, surrounding as well as background foliage, an absence of visual clutter, and most of the notable architectural features of the building all shown in great natural light.

The North Side Wall and Recently Recreated Front Porch of the Circa 1700 Charles Carroll House in Annapolis Maryland September 25th 2016

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Here in this photograph the recently recreated front porch can be seen featuring the pediment porch roof and its classical style columns. While the porch’s supporting half arch brick side appears period like an earlier drawing of the north side of the Charles Carroll House depicting its 1700s appearance illustrates that there were just three or four stone steps leading up to the front door, and that the ground was much higher to the front door. Perhaps the inclusion of the right side oriented flight of nine brick steps in this recreation serves to accommodate both the existing walkway as well as the fact that the St. Mary’s Parish Rectory is located close by, pretty much directly in front of the porch itself.

The Recently Completed Recreated Front Porch of the Circa 1700s Charles Carroll House in Annapolis Maryland September 25th 2016

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Finally the photograph above was taken from the steps leading up alongside the Rectory Building however it afforded a better view of the overall efforts made to accommodate the mid 18th century design, style and features of both the Charles Carroll House front door and porch.

Certainly those involved with this recreation project should be commended for their efforts along with the stewards of the Charles Carroll House.

I hope that you too had an opportunity to enjoy today’s beautiful weather as well,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Traces of Yellow Foliage Across an 1850s Streetscape Suggesting Autumn Has Only Begun • Saturday September 24th 2016

An Overcast Late Morning Sky

Traces of Yellow Hues Branch Across an 1850s Streetscape in Annapolis Maryland September 24th 2016

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With the autumnal equinox having arrived this past Thursday morning there have been those in Annapolis seemingly anxious to note its arrival, via a variety of camera phone images of the occasional fallen leaf or two. As for other local devotees of autumn their own Facebook, Instagram and Twitter feeds have been filled with numerous images of prior year’s colorful foliage as well as rural scenery.

Yes I too could be considered a bit of an autumn fiend for the season’s colors run the gamut of brilliant and intense to captivatingly subdued all the while serving to delight the photographer’s eye. Yes over the coming month or two there will be a multitude of orange, yellow and red hues visibly interspersed among the local green conifers to be truly appreciated on a crisp autumn day.

So it was earlier today that I found myself gazing through these branches protruding across this mid 19th century Historic District streetscape and appreciating the slight wisps of yellow in their leaves, all the while recognizing that autumn has only just begun.

Have a good day and a great weekend,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – 205 thru 201 Hanover Street – Victorian Architecture Photography
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Traces of Yellow Foliage Across an 1850s Streetscape Suggesting Autumn Has Only Begun
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • A Glorious Sunrise and Reflections Upon the Harbor • Friday September 23rd 2016

Early Morning Clarity

A Glorious Sunrise and Reflections Upon the Harbor in Annapolis Maryland September 23rd 2016

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At times a photographer will capture an image that simply speaks for itself, certainly more than any words could improve upon. Early this morning I was fortunate enough to witness this glorious sunrise as it began to rise over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge while reflecting across Annapolis Harbor. The interpretation of this setting I will just leave up to you.

Have a great day,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – Sunrise Photography
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A Glorious Sunrise and Reflections Upon the Harbor
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photographs • Four Street Perspectives of the Circa 1770 Maryland Inn • Thursday September 22nd 2016

Historical 18th Century Inn

Publisher’s Note: This photo journal entry includes the ninth period building or residence being featured in my 18th Century Architecture of Annapolis Collection. In the future as weather conditions, natural lighting and an absence of location clutter permits additional period buildings and residences will be included as well. The singular goal in assembling this annotated photography collection is to present each of the 90 plus 1700’s era buildings and residences located in the City of Annapolis today via my photographs, research and curated content.

Lets begin this post with a bit of background pertaining to the inns of Annapolis. Today the City has nine existing 18th century buildings that previously were or currently serve as inns. Of the latter, seven in number, only the Maryland Inn and one other were originally inns or ordinaries as well as operate as such today.

From the time Annapolis was designated as Maryland’s Capital in the 1690’s inns or ordinaries were an integral part of the City both from an economic and social aspect. For it was back then when elected representatives began traveling to Annapolis so as to attend the annual General Assembly sessions and required lodging, along with an assortment of other visitors as well. So in retrospect it can be stated that lodging, eating and drinking establishments have been necessary City business concerns for over 325 years.

Circa 1770 Maryland Inn as Seen From Church Circle and Main Street in Annapolis Maryland September 22nd 2016

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The Maryland Inn first welcome travelers and guests to its prominent location at Church Street, today Main Street, at Church Circle in the 1770s. Today’s Maryland Inn is much larger than its original late 18th century Georgian style building. Actually its present day exterior includes both Second Empire and Italianate architectural influences that were incorporated into the building over the course of its 19th century expansion. Actually in the photograph above, taken from Main Street and Church Circle, the building’s Mansard slate roof contributes an additional Victorian era design influence.

Circa 1770 Maryland Inn Seen From Church Circle in Annapolis Maryland September 22nd 2016

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The photograph above provides an almost head on if you would perspective of the narrowing or converging front of the inn’s triangular shaped building as seen from Church Circle. The half obscured doorway, located behind potted plants on the brick sidewalk, originally served as the entrance to the inn during the 18th century. Main Street is set along the left sidewalk while Duke of Gloucester Street does so on the right side.

Circa 1770 Maryland Inn as Seen From Duke of Gloucester Street in Annapolis Maryland September 22nd 2016

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The above elevation of the Maryland Inn was taken from upper Duke of Gloucester Street and more clearly shows the original part of the 18th century building, including sections of its stone foundation as well as indications of previous repairs to the brick exterior wall.

Circa 1770 Maryland Inn as Seen From Main Street in Annapolis Maryland September 22nd 2016

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Finally this photograph was taken from upper Main Street and more clearly shows the Maryland Inn’s original front entrance, as well as additional sections of previously repaired brick walls.

While none of these photographs depict the overall expansive exterior or mass of the Maryland Inn today it was the intent of this post to feature the original 18th century part of the building, as well as convey its period architectural ambiance.

Enjoy the rest of the day everyone,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – 16 Church Circle – Georgian and Italianate Photography
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • One of Four Contiguous c1820 Federal Style Townhouses Built for Mr Jeremiah Hughes • Wednesday September 21st 2016

A Yellow Door Makes it Unique Among the Group

One of Mr Jeremiah Hughes Circa 1820 Federal Style Townhouses in Annapolis Maryland September 21st 2016

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Today’s photograph features one of Mr. Jeremiah Hughes four contiguous Federal style townhouses. Perhaps for those making their way down to the Annapolis waterfront from the direction of the Maryland State House the four afore mentioned residences would most likely be the first structures that one might take notice of, especially considering the mass of bricks they encompass together.

In his late teens Mr. Hughes (b 1783 d1848) worked as a silversmith in the City and by 1820 he was the editor and owner of the Maryland Republican newspaper, as well as being a printer. Mr. Hughes later became an early 19th century Annapolis property developer. It was this last business interest of his that led him to have four attached townhouses built in the early 1820s near the State House. The completed houses would go on to serve as rental houses for working class individuals and their families.

Today three of the four rowhouses continue to share various original exterior architectural features including their windows, doors, metal gable roofs, and centered dormers. In addition both the cornices and lintels of each townhouse are made of bricks. So overall the facades of each of the three townhouses today remain fairly original back to when Mr. Hughes had them built almost 200 years ago, other than the colors of their respective front doors

As an aside here on this same City street there are other groups of similar brick townhouses dating from about the same period, although they are comprised of mostly two houses. For the most part Mr. Hughes group of four early 19th century attached brick townhouses represent a unique residential period architectural setting in the Historic District.

Rumor has it that the sun will actually be returning tomorrow and I for one can’t wait,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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One of Four Contiguous c1820 Federal Style Townhouses Built for Mr Jeremiah Hughes
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