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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • A Side Perspective of a Circa 1830 Federal Style House • Friday June 24th 2016

Not Original Yet a Nice Open Porch Indeed

A Side Perspective of a Circa 1830 Federal Style House in Annapolis Maryland June 24th 2016

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Actually the reason for featuring a side perspective of this circa 1830 Federal style house is because the street on which it is located is quite narrow and the parking spaces in front of it are occupied 24/7. Perhaps one day I will happen upon it when there is perhaps street maintenance going on for I would really like to have an unobstructed photograph of its facade. You see true Federal style period houses are not as common in the Annapolis Historic District as one might think, much less having been maintained as well as this one.

It can be assumed that the current condition of the house’s exterior is attributable to its piled brick maroon colored walls, unlike most others that are usually covered in wood siding. Well I guess its fortunate that they are not painted white. In any event this open porch running the full length of the northwest side is not original for it is believed there use to be one across the front of the house, yet being only two bays in width it would not have offered much usable space other than that of a landing.

Hopefully the weather is going to be nice this weekend for there is a cool old large 19th century building being renovated about 8 or 10 blocks away that I can’t wait to see how it looks these days.

Until tomorrow and have a great weekend,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All Pictures Contained Within This Blog Are Copyright © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Barnyard Animals and Metal Art in an Eastport Tree • Thursday June 23rd 2016

Barely Noticeable

Barnyard Animals and Metal Art in an Eastport Tree on a Rainy Day in Annapolis Maryland June 23rd 2016

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In spite of the weather conditions outside the need for a morning walk was in order before my work day began. While yesterday’s afternoon on the Eastern Shore was most enjoyable it turned out that the sunlight for the project was less than desirable, a partial re-shoot is now in order. In any event I truly liked the opportunity to collaborate with a group of spontaneously creative artistic individuals, as well as being able to join them in the evening to eat a picnic table full of fresh, well they were when we ate them, Chesapeake Bay Crabs.

It was that same creative artistic nature exuded by each member of the group yesterday that I pondered over earlier this morning during my walk. Based on the experience I came to realize that public art doesn’t necessarily have to be prominent in its setting, or even obvious to a passerby for that matter, so as to be visually embraced. The outcome of any creative endeavor can stand on its own regardless of the venue or setting.

Perhaps that same point was reinforced even more so when I came upon this work of metal folk art hanging in a tree along an Eastport sidewalk. As one can see there is a rooster, pig, sheep, and cow having been joined, stacked if you would, over each other along with three bells hung at the bottom. Quite frankly with the color of the tree bark this piece of art is hardly noticeable from the sidewalk what with the dark surface of the metal.

I’ve been thinking about this artistic work throughout the morning while reviewing yesterday’s photographs. Yet even though they are of a different artistic genre it seems that I’m viewing each image’s background in a different way or light because of that piece of barnyard folk art, which I believe to be a good thing.

If you find yourself out and about in Annapolis today keep an eye out for art since it could be in that tree you just walked by,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All Pictures Contained Within This Blog Are Copyright © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – Pinterest – Barnyard Animals Art Photography
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Sailing Catamaran Moored on Spa Creek in the Bright Morning Sunshine • Wednesday June 22nd 2016

No Hot Tub But A Dinghy Across its Stern

Sailing Catamaran Moored on a Spa Creek in the Bright Morning Sunshine Annapolis Maryland June 22nd 2016

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When one comes across a shoreline setting such as the one above take heart for Summer has finally taken up residence in Annapolis Maryland. The intensity of the midmorning sunshine across this waterfront scene necessitated a couple of camera adjustments for the first look through the view finder towards this catamaran was quite shadowy and actually quite dark.

Anyway what first caught my eye about this sailing catamaran itself was not its current creek side location but the vessel’s length/beam ration, which seemed quite low indeed. Heck judging solely from its beam one might be able to place a good size hot tub along its stern.

Okay its now time for me to head to the Eastern Shore for a little afternoon photography and with that have a good day,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All Pictures Contained Within This Blog Are Copyright © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Three Periods of Architecture Across the Back of the Circa 1760 Primrose Hill House • Tuesday June 21st 2016

View From the Back, an Old Door and Interior Brick Wall

A NNW Perspective of the Circa 1760 Main House at Primrose Hill in Annapolis Maryland June 21st 2016

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I had opted for a brief visit to Primrose Hill early in the day so as to take a few photographs of the back of the main house, as well as to examine more closely a couple of its architectural features. However before recapping the day’s experience let me first provide a little background about the original owners and notable residents of Primrose Hill.

Ownership and Family the Early Residents of Primrose Hill

The land upon which the main house at Primrose Hill stands today was back in the early to mid 1700’s the site of a large plantation with its related agricultural activities that stretched from the banks of Spa Creek up to near present day Forest Drive. The then large estate and plantation was owned by a Mr. Samuel Young of Annapolis and later inherited by his son Richard Young. Historical research suggests that a ferry boat operated from the Young’s property and along Spa Creek, which itself seems plausible considering water transportation was quite prevalent in the Annapolis area during that era. As an aside 18th century tax records indicate there was an inn on the plantation’s land referred to as Young’s Inn. As to when exactly the inn accommodated travelers in the 18th century is unclear.

In 1748 Colonel Richard Young’s daughter Mary gained ownership of Primrose Hill after her father’s passing. Mary Young would go on to marry Mr. Henry Woodward in June of 1755 who joined her in residence at the Young’s plantation, unfortunately though he passed away in September of 1761.

Even though Mary had inherited a sizeable fortune in land as well as other assets from her father, along with being a noted member of local society, Primrose Hill would be historically associated with her second husband, the noted colonial era portrait painter John Hesselius. The couple were married on January 30th 1763 upon which Mr. Hesselius took up residency at Primrose Hill.

As to whether the construction of the main house at Primrose Hill had already begun or was completed when Mr. Woodward’s lived there is still a matter of speculation. Mr. Hesselius lived in the main house at Primrose Hill until his death in 1778. Finally Mrs. Mary Young Woodward Hesselius continued to live either at Primrose Hill or in the Annapolis area for the most part until the early 19th century, when she moved to Baltimore Maryland.

 

Three Visible Periods of Architecture Across the Back

Three distinct period sections of architecture are visible across the back of the Primrose Hill house today. The photograph above is of a NNW perspective, or back view, beginning on the far right with the original circa 1763 brick Georgian style main house. This four bay wide original section then becomes obscured in the photograph by the two story brick bump out just to the left of the screened in porch. Please note that the back porch is not original to the mid 18th century residence, and along with the house’s present front porch was built in the early 20th century.

The back door of the Main House at Primrose Hill set in its Original Frame in Annapolis Maryland June 21st 2016

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The second architectural period represented in the photograph at the top of this post is that of the previously noted brick bump out section. Thought to have been built in the mid 19th century, although a previous owner indicated to me that it could have been specifically built during or just after the Civil War, with its intended purpose being that of an attached kitchen area on the first floor. While the space on the second floor could have served in a variety of capacities, although it is quite narrow and not big enough for a bedroom although possibly a nursery, its original usage is not clear. Two years ago the then owner was in the process of renovating the space for use as an upstairs bathroom. The photograph below is of the bump out’s exposed second floor north interior brick wall as it was left by the previous owner after the sale of Primrose Hill to a developer.

The North Second Floor Interior Brick Wall on the Mid 1800's Addition to the Main House at Primrose Hill in Annapolis Maryland June 21st 2016

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The third and final architectural period visible in the photograph at the top of this post is that of the frame and clapboard extension, with its slanting shed roof, added during a late 20th century kitchen expansion. For the most part this addition seemed to allow for the installation of a large central kitchen island by the house’s then owners. Regardless this section is of no historical, ascetic or architectural value and I’m quite sure it will either be demolished or completely gutted over the course of the developer’s project renovations.

Okay then thank you for accompanying me on today’s brief visit to Primrose Hill,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Variations on a 1903 Murray Hill Foursquare Style House • Monday June 20th 2016

Foursquare, Georgian or Even Craftsman?

Variations on a 1903 Murray Hill Foursquare Style House in Annapolis Maryland June 20th 2016

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After getting in a little early morning paddling along the quieter confines of lower Spa Creek I spent time walking about under the seemingly landscaped tree canopies in the Murray Hill neighborhood of Annapolis. With the Summer solstice now at hand the neighborhood’s stately residences, often set a fair amount back from the street, appear even more picturesque what with them being shaded from the midday sun by a multitude of branches on nearby large mature trees.

The use of the word variation within today’s blog post title is due in part to the two, actual and implied, architectural designs visible on the front and sides of this 1903 predominantly Foursquare style house. Certainly the implied one is based on the Georgian theme brick work encompassing each side of the house. In most cases Annapolis Foursquare style houses have stucco facades, for what ever reason that may be, and not that of brick. Combined with the black window shutters and moderately sized turned white porch columns certainly one could suggest this house is reminiscent of the Georgian style.

In addition to the two afore noted prominent design styles were one to view the house’s Hip roof from slightly to the right side a centered double window dormer can be seen, partially obscured by the end of a hanging tree branch. In addition there are two individual set back dormers located on either end of the roof as well. As an aside, although not visible in the photograph above, the front door of the house denotes more of a Craftsman style with it being slightly oversized in width, featuring three lower recessed rectangular panels and topped with a mutton grid of 8″ window panes.

Foursquare, Georgian or American Craftsman style? Based on my observations I would still be inclined to classify it as being a Foursquare style house considering its lines, mass and overall presence from the street. Also the Hip roof and its three dormers tend to support a Foursquare design as well, at least to me anyway. As to the house’s brick facade and exterior walls, along with the expansive front porch, well perhaps they combine to suggest a perception of it being Georgian like in style. Finally the Craftsman influence on the front door, while not surprising to find on a Foursquare house, is minimal at best in relationship to the structure’s overall architectural period style.

Thanks for coming along on today’s house tour in Murray Hill and have a great week,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All Pictures Contained Within This Blog Are Copyright © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • St. Mary’s Parish Church Bell Tower and Steeple on Duke of Gloucester Street • Sunday June 19th 2016

Gothic Revival Architecture & the Sound of Bells

St. Mary's Parish Church Bell Tower and Steeple on Duke of Gloucester Street in Annapolis Maryland June 19th 2016

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Taking in the historical buildings while walking along Duke of Gloucester Street early on a Sunday morning usually entails pausing out front of St. Mary’s Parish Church, at least it does for me, so as to wonder at both the scale and details of its mid 19th century Gothic Revival architecture. Of course hearing the bells in the tower ringing out formally announcing the commencement of services certainly enhances the ambiance of such a Sunday morning setting. Fortunately I was able to experience both of those things earlier today as Annapolis parishioners filed into church for morning mass.

It was a most inspirational way to begin one’s day,

Glenn

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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Attached 1908 Georgian Revival Houses Built for Mrs. Porter’s Two Daughters • Saturday June 18th 2016

The Symmetry of Marguerite & Rosalie’s Townhouses

Attached 1908 Georgian Revival Houses Built for Mrs. Porter's Two Daughters in Annapolis Maryland June 18th 2016

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While certainly taken from a front facing, or one-dimensional, perspective I had chosen to do so in order to capture a higher degree of architectural exactness and symmetry visible on these attached 100+ year old brick townhouse. At first though I had positioned myself on either end of the front yard to be able to include more of each townhouse’s design elements visible along their respective sides, including the hip roof. However the addition of the building’s depth into the viewfinder tended to diminish the afore mentioned architectural exactness, one of the more defining overall characteristics of these 1908 Georgian Revival townhouses.

As an aside having passed by these same townhouses numerous times over the years this morning I was taken aback seeing the front yard, steps and porches devoid of such things as kids toys, grilles and bikes that were a constant presence out front even during the Winter. Without wasting any time I methodically took three or four photographs before the front yard would once again transition back into a playground.

Located on a Historic District street, a block or so from the US Naval Academy, these townhouses were built for a Mrs. Elizabeth M. Porter, wife of US Navy Commodore Theodoric Porter. In 1900 Mrs. Porter acquired ownership of a prominent 18th century house along with its various outbuildings and land where she and her daughters had been residing. Three years later Mrs. Porter set about having a mid 19th century brick extension to her house taken down where in due course the townhouses featured above would be constructed. During that same period Mrs. Porter subdivided the land where the demolished extension previously stood from her own estate’s property and had it deeded as separate lot in Anne Arundel county land records.

With her newly deeded lot cleared Mrs. Porter had these two attached brick townhouses constructed in 1908, one for each of her daughters Marguerite Mason Porter Cusachs and Rosalie Porter Van Ness. While I’m not sure if either of Mrs. Porter’s daughters resided in their respective houses for any appreciable period of time, Marguerite was married in 1903 and Rosalie in 1906, they would come into ownership of each individual townhouse in 1910 after Mrs. Porter’s passing in 1909.

So here we have two attached townhouses sharing strikingly identical architectural elements, built by a mother for her two daughters, that once again attests to how most Annapolis historical houses or buildings have an interesting story to be told. Heck in the case of these particular historical townhouse I have left out the noted early Maryland governors, a Spanish instructor at the US Naval Academy, a marriage taking place at St. Anne’s Church that would end in divorce, and numerous financial property transactions that took place among immediate family members. However including all of those things would make today’s post seem more of a cross between a City living museum tour, sans the $20, and an Annapolis DMZ-esque noted citizen behind the scenes story. Heck I just like the architectural symmetry of these townhouses and thought that you might as well.

Enjoy the rest of your day and until tomorrow then,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All Pictures Contained Within This Blog Are Copyright © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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