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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Circa 1885 Lavender Hue Victorian Italianate Rowhouse • Saturday August 27th 2016

Period Colors and Exceptional Details

c1885 Lavender Hue Victorian Italianate Row House in the Annapolis Maryland Historic District August 27th 2016

Click on Photograph to Enlarge

Without a doubt this lavender late 19th century Italianate rowhouse tends to catch one’s eye, unless of course you’re one of those drivers traveling down the busy Historic District street where it is located at 45+ mph – the speed limit is actually 25 mph. In that case you most certainly will miss it, which in itself is a shame. Perhaps though the house’s ambiance is best appreciated on a weekend morning walk when the traffic is a tad less frantic, which happens to be when I paid it a visit.

In any event I for one have always been captivated by not only the house’s period colors, but more so the multitude of architectural details that have been incorporated across its facade. Perhaps most noticeable, at least to me anyway, are the multilevel bay windows that appear to be encroaching out on to the sidewalk. While the first and second floor bays feature different size base panels, one on each of its respective three sides, where as the top bay window features a turret style roof. Perhaps one might imagine relaxing in a chair or sitting at a desk in front of one of the protruding bay windows and gazing out at the people walking along the sidewalk as cars drive past below.

Now as to the various trim details those too garner one’s attention, perhaps more so than this row house’s lavender siding and period trim colors. For example there are the oversize ornate brackets and dentil trim along the cornice that are painted gold and orange. In addition, and not often seen in Annapolis I might also add, both the first floor bay window as well as the front porch landing roof also have dentil trim along their respective upper sections. In terms of the house’s more traditional millwork note the level of detail along the upper cornice that is more akin to an elaborate interior oversize crown molding pattern. Finally there is the vertically oriented and relatively small stick and bead accent pattern set between the front landing’s upper support columns. Oh and the house has a Mansard roof on the right front side as well as along its alleyway.

I was glad to finally be able to feature this quintessential late Victorian era house after so many years. Its not that I was driving past it to quickly, no it was simply a matter of finding the right perspective, along with taking a few artistic liberties so as to present it in the best light.

Enjoy the rest of the day,

Glenn

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Circa 1885 Lavender Hue Victorian Italianate Rowhouse
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Sandbagger Sloops Bull and Bear Docked at Sunrise • Friday August 26th 2016

A Picturesque Waterfront Morning

Sandbagger Sloop Bull Docked at a National Sailing Hall of Fame Dock Just After Sunrise in Annapolis Maryland August 26th 2016

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Not much needs to be written about today’s featured photographs, especially for those familiar with these two sandbagger sailing sloops often seen at the docks of the National Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis.

Both photographs were taken at sunrise and certainly portray both sailing sloops classic lines along with the calmness and tranquility of this picturesque Summer morning.

Click on either photograph so as to view its corresponding larger version.

Pictured above is the Sandbagger Bull and beneath is the Sandbagger Bear

Sandbagger Sloop Bear Docked at a National Sailing Hall of Fame Dock Just After Sunrise in Annapolis Maryland August 26th 2016

Click on Photograph to Enlarge

Kind of a nice way to start one’s day don’t you agree?

Have a great weekend everyone,

Glenn

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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • A Convergence of c1890 Architectural Styles on a Shaded Streetscape • Thursday August 25th 2016

A Mix of Federal, Greek and Italianate Styles

A Convergence of c1890 Architectural Styles on a Summer Streetscape in the Annapolis Maryland Historic District August 25th 2016

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Earlier in the day while walking about in the Historic District I found myself a bit captivated by this narrow streetscape, pictured above, while at the same time thinking about modern day homogenized exterior house styles. No it isn’t an urban versus a suburban kind of thing, well maybe a little, rather perhaps the presence of architectural details on older houses in comparison to even a modicum of exterior characteristics on those built today.

For you see there in front of me at the time were two free standing houses both of which were built in the early 1890’s. Certainly not grand in size nor even built of stone or brick, think Brice, Carroll or Paca Houses here in Annapolis, while the people that had these particular houses built were I believe for the most representative of the then City’s middle class.

My own familiarity with those who lived on this City street back then is that a number of them worked at either the US Naval Academy in various capacities, owned small local business or were practitioners of various skilled trades. Yet on just about each of their respective houses, regardless of its size, one finds that they chose to incorporate a sense of individual style upon the exterior of their residences. Where as today the purchaser of a newly built house is more often presented choices for interior features such as appliance finishes, counter tops or the inclusion of a great room, i.e., an open concept setting. As to the exterior those buyer’s choices tend to center on what color of siding that they would prefer, if even that option.

So back to those two late 19th century houses above the slightly larger one is more indicative of the Federal style, or perhaps more specifically for that period Federal Revival. In addition there are at least two other noticeable exterior style influences visible including on the house’s windows Greek Revival style pediments, as does the front door. Also another classical contributing detail are the three sections of upward curved fascia board, each one bordered by elongated ornate brackets.

It is those same brackets, as well as the more numerous smaller ones, that convey the second exterior style on the house’s facade that being Italianate. It is visible in the preponderance of elaborate curved brackets along the length of the cornice, something one seldom sees on similar style period houses in Annapolis.

As an aside in reviewing both research and architectural documents pertaining to this house they classify it as either Vernacular Victorian, Federal or even Greek Revival in its overall style. For the most part though I would tend to stay with Federal.

As to not forget about the slightly smaller house on the left most side upon closer examination it is only two bays in width, versus three on its larger neighbor, while it too has pediment tops on each window as well as a preponderance of decorative brackets along its own cornice. So perhaps due to this house’s smaller size a Greek Revival classification could to a degree be appropriate.

While today these two houses might seem a bit elaborate on the exterior though remember it was not upper class business types or successful professionals that had these kinds of houses built well over a century ago, nor were the size of the lots they occupied large by any means. Perhaps it was only an expression of the success that their own hard work had afforded them, in that they chose to convey such via the exterior appearance of their residences. Or then again it might have been just a trend of the era, along with an availability of craftsmen to design and build houses with such an assortment of exterior details.

Finally it does appear to be the case that well, they don’t build them like that anymore for a variety of reasons, and to a degree its such a shame.

Glenn

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Annapolis Maryland Blog – Pinterest – Late Victorian Residential Architecture Photography
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • A Lone Sailboat Moored Among Power Boats on St. Mary’s Cove Just After Sunrise • Wednesday August 24th 2016

Togetherness Not Exclusivity Along the Cove

A Lone Sailboat Moored Among a Group of Power Boats on St. Mary's Cove Just After Sunrise in Annapolis Maryland August 24th 2016

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At first I never even noticed the one sailboat moored behind this group of power boats on St. Mary’s Cove. Perhaps it was simply the early morning hour, although initially they appeared to be dominating this particular group of Spa Creek mooring buoys just down the hill from the Charles Carroll House and St. Mary’s Rectory.

Yes I know that in Annapolis both sailors and boaters get along fine whether underway on the Severn River or Chesapeake Bay, as well as dockside. So no it wasn’t a perception of exclusivity on my part in failing to see that lone sailboat earlier, just tired eyes and lacking my first cup of coffee of the day is all.

Enjoy today’s nice weather and have a great day,

Glenn

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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • A Plethora of Green Accents a Circa 1930 American Foursquare Style House • Tuesday August 23rd 2016

The Actual Colors Without any Adjustments

A Plethora of Green Accents a Circa 1930 American Foursquare Style House in Annapolis Maryland August 23rd 2016

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Yes even I found it a bit hard to believe the amount of green present in this scene after uploading the photograph from my camera. The setting itself did not appear to be quite so greenish if you would, at least through the viewfinder, when I took it earlier. In any event, and as the caption over the photograph states, the green hues of the lawn, bushes and foliage have not been altered by any post processing actions nor was the Aspen green stucco of the house’s facade. Oh I also didn’t use any lens filter, not a fan of them actually. Pretty cool hues aren’t they? Especially given our Spring like Summer day?

Anyway this house is representative of American Foursquare residential architecture and was built I believe in 1930. It features a kind of steep hip style roof with a centered, though relatively small, front facing dormer. The house itself occupies a fairly narrow lot, especially with its eastern bay extension, although it is set back a decent amount from the sidewalk.

Thank you for tagging along on today’s virtual architectural walk in Annapolis and as always have a good afternoon,

Glenn

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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Reminiscent of the Late 18th Century Architectural Grandeur Along Lower West Street • Monday August 22nd 2016

Set on Both a Late 1700’s & Present Day Commercial Street

Distinctive Late 18th Century Federal Architecture on Lower West Street in Annapolis Maryland August 22nd 2016

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When one examines the late 18th century history of Annapolis a bit closer, let’s say beyond that of George Washington resigning his commission at the Maryland State House, its believed that the City had a population of 2,000 people or so, including slaves and indentured servants, at that time. As to where those residents lived and City commerce took place well over two hundred years ago seems for the most part to mirror present day downtown Annapolis popular commercial locations and busy thoroughfares. Certainly one good example of a then existing late 18th century business corridor would be the lower West Street area extending from Church Circle to City Gate Lane, a block beyond the intersection of Calvert and Cathedral Streets.

On Church Circle by the late 1700’s Reynolds Tavern had been in existence for decades while the first St. Anne’s Church, c1704, had already been demolished due to its unsafe condition as the congregation was in the process of constructing its second church. While on lower West Street there were already five brick buildings, all of which still stand today, located along lower West Street.

One such building is featured in today’s photo journal post. Referred to over the years as the Frances Bryce Boarding House its date of construction is thought to be in the late 18th century. The building’s informal name is historically associated with a Mrs. Frances Bryce, the window of a City mariner, who was known to have operated her residence as a boarding house in order to make ends meet after the death of her husband. Actually Mrs. Bryce is believed to have managed multiple boarding houses in the downtown area at the time including one on Francis Street. According to public notices from that period Mrs. Bryce’s Francis Street building served as a place of lodging for members of the Continental Congress that were in Annapolis during late 1783 to early 1784 to formally ratify the Treaty of Paris.

In addition to its use as a boarding house suggestions have been made that noted Maryland politician William Pinkney was born in this same lower West Street building, although his March 1764 date of birth suggests this might not have been the case, or if so it took place in a previous structure located on the same lot. Actually his childhood home is said to have had a view of the Chesapeake Bay which is not possible from lower West Street. The house was the residence of the last State of Maryland Chancellor one John Johnson Jr. in the 1800’s. Currently the building serves as a law office.

As to the architectural period details of the building I would direct you to an early 2015 blog post of mine that features related information about it – click here to view that photo journal entry. As noted in today’s blog post title this building is an example of the architectural grandeur that one would have experienced over two hundred years ago walking along a then bustling commercial lower West Street.

Have a good week everyone,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – Federal Architecture Photography – Greek Revival Accents
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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Empty Transient Mooring Buoys and Sailboats Docked Beyond the Bridge • Sunday August 21st 2016

Framed by the Bridge and Water

Mooring Buoys and Sailboats Docked Beyond the Bridge in Annapolis Maryland August 21st 2016

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Mooring buoys 47 through 49 were certainly available to any transient boaters when I took this photograph, which come to think about it was a little surprising considering the time of year here in Annapolis. In any event today’s setting is comprised of four docked sailboats with their bows pointed outwards of course set just beyond the harbor bridge. Seemingly framed on the top by a section of the bridge, along either side by its supporting pillars and at the bottom by the water’s surface I found it a different take on a ubiquitous City dockside scene.

Have a pleasant day everyone,

Glenn

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