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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – Sectional Expansiveness And A Winter Garden Setting at the William Paca House – Thursday February 11th 2016

A Dormant Garden Scene

The William Paca House Garden on a Brisk Winter Morning in Annapolis Maryland February 11th 2016

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Perhaps on a Winter day with a 9 degree wind chill visiting the William Paca House & Garden in Annapolis was not the best occasion for a bit of urban architecture and nature photography. Actually though the cold morning air seemed as if to accent the clarity of this historical garden setting, along with the sectional expansiveness of Mr. Paca’s house in the background, that not only caught my eye but numbed my fingers as well while pressing the camera’s shutter release button.

I am so looking forward to experiencing the colorful hues of the flowers in Mr. Paca’s Garden this Spring so now where is that right hand glove of mine?

Glenn

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The William Paca House Garden on a Brisk Winter Morning
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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – Cityscapes • St. Mary’s Church Steeple Above the Yacht Basin Waterfront – Wednesday February 10th 2016

Winter Harbor Views

St Marys Church Steeple Set Above the Annapolis Yacht Basin Waterfront • Cityscapes • February 10th 2016

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While gazing out across the harbor my mind conjured up images of very large vessels docked along the Annapolis Yacht Basin waterfront while transient vessels of various types could be seen tied up to nearby mooring buoys. Yes kayakers paddled their way along and through the mooring fields, dinghies conveyed their respective crews to shore while water taxis ferried passengers back and forth across the harbor.

Of course it only took a few minutes of standing along the Annapolis waterfront while embracing the 18 knot NW winds and sub freezing chill to remind me that Spring is over a month away. Shocked back into reality this waterfront cityscape of the steeple of St. Mary’s Church, set almost majestically on a rise along Duke of Gloucester Street, and the empty bulkhead docks at the Yacht Basin had to suffice instead.

How many days again is it until Spring?

Glenn

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St. Mary’s Church Steeple Set Above the Annapolis Yacht Club Waterfront
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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – Philanthropist Paul Mellon Resided in this House While Attending St. John’s College – Tuesday February 9th 2016

Early & Mid 18th Century Georgian Style

Set On Land Owned By Charles Carroll the Settler and Built in the 18th Century in Annapolis Maryland February 9th 2016

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While perhaps not listed as often on City visitor destination guides as other Annapolis 18th century Georgian style houses tend to be, that in itself does not diminish the significance of today’s featured building both in its period architectural style nor its 300 years of ownership and residential history.

To begin with this house was built over three distinct periods of time encompassing both the first quarter and second half of the 1700’s as well as the mid to late 1800’s. In between 1718 and 1725 a three bay wide frame one story house was constructed on land, thought to be owned at the time by Charles Carroll the Settler, for use as a tenement. This section of the house can be seen bordered on the left by the center porch and to the right side next to the tree. Note the different brick style on that part of the facade along with the vertical border seam on the left inner side of the porch. Also take note that while this is the original section of the house its frame siding was not covered in brick until the latter part of the 19th century (see below).

The second phase of expansion began in 1760 when the two left bays were added on the south side of the house and is recognizable in its different style brick work. With this addition the house’s facade took on the appearance of a five bay wide center entrance Georgian style house.

Although not visible in the picture above the third phase of expansion and alterations to the house took place during the mid to late 19th century when a rear extension, new roofline and dormer style second floor windows were added. According to research articles the interior of the house today exhibits a selection of original 18th century architectural elements including the south exterior brick wall of the tenement house along with the structure’s expanded late 18th century roof.

At times referred to as the Charles Carroll the Settler or the Magruder House research indicates that Mr. Carroll owned the land where the afore mentioned three bay wide frame tenement house was built, although perhaps that transpired after the lot was sold to a Mr. Thomas Larkin. Later in 1762 the house and property was bought by a Mr. John Hall who is believed to be responsible for constructing the two bay wide south extension to the house. As to the late 19th century period of renovations the house was purchased by a Henrietta Magruder in the mid 19th century who had the back extension built along with having the original frame section of the house faced with brick.

Finally it should be noted that among the list of previous owners of the house was one Mr. Paul Mellon, noted Virginia philanthropist and son of Andrew Mellon, who briefly attended school in Annapolis at St. John’s College. Mr. Paul Mellon went on to have the house renovated and eventually sold it to St. John’s College in 1948. St. John’s College in turn sold the house in 1956 to the Poe family.

Consider the next time you happen to find yourself walking on Duke of Gloucester Street to perhaps take a short detour in order to have a look at this fine example of 18th century Annapolis architecture.

Have a pleasant evening everyone,

Glenn

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Set on Land Then Owned by Charles Carroll the Settler and Built in the 1720s & 1760s
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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – Blue 1880 Victorian Mansard Style House with Gabled Dormers – Monday February 8th 2016

A Historic District Double

A Blue 1880 Victorian Mansard Style House With Gabled Dormers in Annapolis Maryland February 8th 2016

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It was nice to have had mostly sunny skies throughout the morning and early afternoon in Annapolis that made for a good picture taking experience for sure.

Upon coming across this 1880 Victorian Mansard house it was apparent how challenging it would be to photograph due to a variety of overhead distractions but more so the opposite left and right pitches of its porch and roof lines respectively. Having walked past this same house hundreds of times over the years it was always the presence of cars parked along the curb that dissuaded me from taking any pictures.

So with a timely, yet what would turn out to be quite brief, absence of vehicles out front of the house I quickly positioned myself to take a couple of pictures, or so I thought. It seemed that the afore mentioned porch and roof pitches, clearly visible in the camera’s viewfinder at the time, had me in a bit of visual quandary. Actually no mater what adjustments I made in order to achieve a better degree of horizontal balance with either the roof or porch line pitches they appeared dramatically off kilter to say the least. Finally I came to the realization that by having both of them slightly off pitch was the optimal perspective in order to take the picture.

Enjoy the rest of your day,

Glenn

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An 1880 Victorian Mansard Style House With Gable Dormers on Prince George Street
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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – A Bricked In Outline of the Original Doorway at the 1770’s John Brewer Tavern – Sunday February 7th 2016

An Unobstructed View

John Brewer's Original 1770's Tavern in Annapolis Maryland February 7th 2016

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Hopefully no matter the device one happens to be viewing this blog post on the bricked in outline of the original doorway on John Brewer’s early 1770’s tavern in Annapolis is readily apparent. Having already posted the adjoining 1780’s extension of Mr. Brewer’s Tavern, its front door visible on the far right of the picture above, in December 2015 (click here to view that post) today I am featuring my picture of the original tavern itself.

Upon a closer examination of its Georgian style facade one can see that Mr. Brewer’s original tavern building was only three bays in width and two stories high where the bricked in doorway served as a centered entranceway, itself flanked by six over four double hung windows. By following the brick work along the left side of the current door frame, and above it to the second story six over six window, one can see where the original building ended.

In the 1780’s Mr. Brewer went on to enlarge his tavern with the addition of four more bays to the west side yet incorporated the same style Flemish bond brick work as was used in the construction of his original building. Mr. Brewer died in 1788 upon which his wife Susanna continued to operate his business as more of a boarding house concern, including rooms for students that attended St. John’s College, until her death in 1809.

Mr. Brewer’s second cousin Nicholas Brewer, a judge for the Orphans Court, inherited the house where he set about converting it into a single family residence. Judge Nicholas Brewer resided in the house until his death in 1839. Afterwards Nicholas Brewer II inherited the house who was responsible for renovating the house in the mid 19th century that included the addition of the side by side Greek Revival style entrance doors, visible on both houses today.

After Nicholas Brewer II’s death in 1864 the house and property came into possession of Nicholas Brewer III who converted a portion of the building back into a boarding house while residing in the other part of it with his family. In 1903 Nicholas Brewer III sold the building to a party outside of the Brewer family, the first time in over 130 years, upon which it was converted into two separate residences.

One final note of interest is that the original John Brewer Tavern was purchased later in the 20th century by George and Mary Jane Hannon who undertook a restoration of the house. In 1969 the Hannon’s conveyed what is thought to be the first historic easement for the State of Maryland that provided for the approval of any future alterations, restorations or maintenance performed on either the interior or exterior of the building.

While this historical building could be said to show its age, especially on the exterior, there have been signs of work taking place inside of it of late.

Enjoy the rest of your day,

Glenn

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The Original Side of the 1770s John Brewer Tavern on Cornhill Street
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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – A Waterfront Backdrop, Boats Docked for the Winter & Broken Clouds Across the Harbor – Saturday February 6th 2016

Surrealistic Overtones

Broken Clouds Over the Harbor on a Winter Morning in Annapolis Maryland February 6th 2016

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It was nice being able to enjoy the latter part of the morning while watching the clouds position themselves into so many different shapes and patterns over Annapolis Harbor.

One might consider that this scene comprised of St. Mary’s Church and the Annapolis Waterfront Hotel – both visible from across the harbor, docked sailboats in the foreground and the expansive billowing clouds against a blue sky projects possible dreamlike overtones to a casual observer. Actually the clouds themselves could be thought of as surreal like in appearance.

Enjoy your weekend,

Glenn

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Boats Docked on the Eastport Side of the Harbor Under Broken Clouds
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Annapolis Experience Blog Picture Of The Day – Two 1880’s Vernacular Style Row Houses on Randall Street – Friday February 5th 2016

Four Over Three

Two 1880s Vernacular Style Row House on Randall Street in Annapolis Maryland February 5th 2016

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While not quite symmetrical in appearance I found that the windows on these two adjoining 1880’s row house project a certain degree of balance here along Randal Street. The house on the left features two over two style windows while the one on the right has six over six double hung windows. Both houses have center brick chimneys as well as Victorian influenced roofline millwork, also note the copper downspout on the far right side of the picture.

With the clouds now breaking up and the sun making an appearance perhaps its time to head outside once again to take more pictures of Annapolis, who knows I might just run into my shadow along the way as well.

Have a good day,

Glenn

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Annapolis Maryland Blogs – Vernacular Row Houses Photography
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Two 1880s Vernacular Style Row Houses on Randall Street
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