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Annapolis Maryland Blog Photographs • A Distinctive Period Looking c1790 Georgian Style Building Both Small and Unassuming • Sunday September 4th 2016

Centuries Old Yet Hardly Noticed

Publisher’s Note: This photo journal entry features the sixth period building or house to be included in the 18th Century Architecture of Annapolis Series. In the future as weather conditions, natural lighting and an absence of location clutter permits additional buildings and houses from the 1700s will be posted as well. The goal in assembling this annotated collection of my photographs and curated content related to these 18th century structures is to present each of the 90 or so 1700’s historical buildings found in the City of Annapolis today. Each of the previously posted entries in this collection are available here.

Today’s photographs show perhaps one of the more unassuming yet authentic looking 18th century buildings in Annapolis. Of course how many visitors, or even locals for that matter, have even noticed its presence given its small stature, white stucco exterior and busy location at the intersection of two narrow City streets? Like many repurposed older commercial buildings in the downtown Historic District a passerby would tend to notice either the store or window fronts, outdoor tables or sidewalk signage but not the buildings themselves. However as I have written about of late experiencing the variety of still standing 18th century buildings and houses that makes Annapolis so unique is often a matter of looking up, around or as I did earlier today, simply cross over to the other side of the street.

Distinctive Period Looking c1790 Georgian Style Corner Building in Annapolis Maryland September 4th 2016

Click on Photograph to Enlarge

This 1790 Georgian style building is located on the corner of Prince George and Randall Streets and to the best of my recollection has for the last decade or so served as the location of four cafes or eateries, the last one having closed earlier this year. As you can see by the papered over store front glass and City permits taped up on the left most bay window its currently being renovated and will become the building’s fifth recent restaurant. The new eatery is believed to be Ten Ten Ramen, currently with a location on North Charles Street in Baltimore that opened in 2014.

As to the building itself its of frame construction and covered in stucco that is two bays wide measuring 20′ at best. A somewhat oversized chimney can be seen in the center of the building’s seamed metal roof. The two second story windows appear to occupy their original locations while the ground level bay window on Randall Street, along with the corner oriented entrance, are the result of much later alterations. I would suspect that due to the building’s location near the downtown waterfront that it served as both a residence as well as a shop, perhaps individually and jointly as well over the years.

Altered Entrance and Windows of a Corner c1790 Georgian Style Building in Annapolis Maryland September 4th 2016

Click on Photograph to Enlarge

The afore mentioned recent cafes and eateries that were located in the building consisted of, in chronological order, The Kitchen, Sugar Buns in the Kitchen, Moorings the Kettle, and most recently the Purple Thread Cafe.

From a historical and architectural awareness standpoint it could be said that visitors tend to associate today’s more well known Annapolis 18th century buildings and residences i.e., the Paca and Brice Houses, the Maryland State House and McDowell Hall at St. John’s College etc. of being more typical in size of the that period. Actually they are far from being representative of it where as today’s featured building is small yet functional – practical in its size if you would. It occupies a narrow footprint along the street, at least on the Randall Street side, while deeper proportionally on Prince George Street. Standing across the street one could perhaps envision themselves back in late 1700s Annapolis with a dirt street set before them and catching sight of the early 1700’s Sands House nearby on the far left as the commercial activity taking place along the City waterfront and on Market Space could be clearly heard coming from just around the corner.

Yes hundreds of years ago a variety of similar size buildings like the one above would have been seen along the streets near the waterfront, more so than the large brick plantation and townhouses often associated with Colonial Annapolis today. See for yourself the next time you are downtown for in most cases its simply a matter of looking around, up a little or walking across the street.

Have a good evening,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2016 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2016 G J Gibson Photography LLC
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A Distinctive Period Looking c1790 Georgian Style Building Both Small and Unassuming
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A Distinctive Period Looking c1790 Georgian Style Building Both Small and Unassuming
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