Indexes

Archives

Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Reconstituted 18th Century Victualling Waterfront Warehouse on Old Church Street • Friday March 24th 2017

Rebuilt in the Years Following a 1790 Bakery Fire

Publisher’s Note: This photo journal entry features the fourteenth period building or house to be included in the 18th Century Architecture of Annapolis Series. In the future as weather conditions, natural lighting and an absence of location clutter permits additional buildings and houses from the 1700s will be posted as well. The goal in assembling this annotated collection of my photographs and curated content related to these 18th century structures is to present each of the 90 or so 1700’s historical buildings found in the City of Annapolis today. Each of the previously posted entries in this collection are available here.

Reconstituted 18th Century Victualling Waterfront Warehouse on Old Church Street in Annapolis Maryland March 24th 2017

Click on Photograph to Enlarge

While the reconstituted centuries old waterfront warehouse featured above was rebuilt in the early 19th century I have included it in this collection of 18th century Annapolis architecture series not only for its 250 year old pedigree but also that parts of its current foundation and exterior walls date back to the 1700s.

From a chronological perspective the original warehouse was built on land first owned by Mr. Amos Garrett, noted for being the first Mayor of Annapolis Maryland. Dr. Charles Carroll, Jr. purchased the land from the former’s estate in 1737 for the sum of 350 pounds. In the 1740’s Dr. Charles Carroll, Jr. sold the land to Mr. Daniel Dulaney the Elder, a business associate of Dr. Charles Carroll, Jr., who in turn would transfer its ownership to one of his sons, Walter Dulaney, in 1748. Records from that period indicated that multiple warehouses existed along the waterfront area at lower Church Street, one of which being Mr. Walter Dulaney’s and was referred to as the “Prize House” where wooden hogsheads were filled with tobacco prior to shipment abroad.

At the onset of the Revolutionary War Walter Dulaney, a British Loyalist though having served as Mayor of Annapolis, was a victim of the heated political climate of the period impacting both his property holdings and business dealings. Mr. Dulaney’s waterfront building was appropriated and used by local authorities as a victualing warehouse for the storage and distribution of food stocks to the Continental Army. After the war most of the property of British Loyalists in Maryland would be confiscated by the state government, including Mr. Dulaney’s warehouse. In 1785 a Mr. William Wilkins, an Annapolis merchant of the day, gained title to the warehouse and lot of Mr. Dulaney, having purchased it from the State of Maryland for 1,400 pounds.

Disaster struck the 18th century warehouse when a fire occurred on lower Church Street, today Main Street, on January 21st 1790 originating in a bakery that caused extensive damage to houses as well as warehouses along the block, Mr. Wilkins included. An article in the Maryland Gazette at that time reported that most of the structures in the area burned to the ground. Mr. Wilkins opted to not rebuild on his lot(s) and would go on to sell them for 100 pounds in 1810 to Mr. John and George Barber.

The Barber’s undertook having a replacement warehouse and store built on their recently acquired lot using parts of the original warehouse’s foundation, as well as sections of its former brick exterior walls and debris leftover from the fire. It is the Barber’s warehouse and store built in the early 1800s that one sees today in downtown Annapolis where Main and Compromise Streets meet. The Barber’s would go on to operate their business out of the rebuilt warehouse, that included a shipping service to Baltimore, until the mid 1820s when John Barber passed away. Afterwards in 1822 Mr. John and Adam Miller, also City merchants, leased the warehouse and store of the Barbers continuing to do so until 1837, when it was listed for sale after the passing of George Barber, though it would not come to be sold until the early 1850s.

In 1852 a Mr. Nicholas Kilman purchased the buildings and land from the Barber Estate where he not only resided but also operated his store called “Noah’s Ark“. As an aside the warehouse at this time was three stories in height, not the two as seen today. Unfortunately though in 1864 there was yet another fire in the warehouse causing extensive damage to its third floor as well as throughout the interior. Mr. Kilman would go on to repair his warehouse and store after the fire, although the third floor was not rebuilt. Mr. Kilman died in 1870, although the settlement of his estate was not completed until 1890. It was during the final settlement that the adjoining wood frame building and lot that Mr. Kilman also owned, today the Annapolis Summer Theater building, was deeded separately from the warehouse and sold off to a separate buyer.

Since the late 19th century this former tobacco prize or victualing warehouse building has served as the location for a variety of commercial concerns as well as residential dwellings. Over the course of the last decade or so the former warehouse was the location for the Historic Annapolis Museum Store, then briefly a retail clothing store and today the Capital Teas store, formerly located on Cornhill Street in an 18th century building as well.

I’ll conclude today’s post by restating that most of this lower Main Street brick building dates to the early 19th century. However on the other hand the original building located here in the 1700s has a strong association with Annapolis Colonial History and in addition construction materials as well certain building elements from Mr. Dulaney’s 18th century waterfront warehouse are incorporated into the reconstituted brick structure seen here today.

Have a good weekend,

Glenn

This Blog is Copyright © 2017 Annapolis Experience
All images contained within this Blog are Copyrighted © 2017 G J Gibson Photography LLC
Annapolis Maryland Blog – Circa 1770 Vernacular Georgian Architecture Photography
No part of this article, including photographs, can be used without the permission of Annapolis Experience and or G Gibson Photo Art except under the fair use component of U.S. Copyright Law
Reconstituted 18th Century Victualling Waterfront Warehouse on Old Church Street
Contact us here with any comments or questions about the Annapolis Experience Blog
Annapolis Architectural Historian – 77 Main Street – Daniel Dulaney Warehouse Tenement
Visit us at Annapolis Experience
Reconstituted 18th Century Victualling Waterfront Warehouse on Old Church Street
Follow us on Twitter @GlennAnnapolis
Annapolis Photographs – Saving Places – This Place Matters – Pinterest – Capital Teas
For high resolution images of photographs included in this post Contact Us

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

2 comments to Annapolis Maryland Blog Photograph • Reconstituted 18th Century Victualling Waterfront Warehouse on Old Church Street • Friday March 24th 2017

  • Elaine Sack

    Hello, Glenn,
    Just had to pop into the comments to tell you how much I appreciate your posting today…the information about the iconic waterfront warehouse that now houses Capital Teas and the early morning light in the photo are of such high quality! Really fantastic.
    No matter what the weather 😉 you always provide thorough historical insight and the best photos of Annapolis. I know I have written before about reading your blog every day with my AM coffee, but just had to thank you, again – Your postings are a treasure that I thoroughly enjoy. -Elaine

    • anpbaystate

      Elaine it was most delightful to hear from you once again. It is very reassuring to know that you are still enjoying both my daily photographs and their annotated articles that depict Annapolis. Your latest message is much appreciated and I sincerely hope that my creative pursuits will continue to be savored with your coffee in the morning. Best regards, Glenn

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>